About your Search

20121225
20121225
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 6
FBC 4
SFGTV2 3
KICU 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
MSNBCW 2
SFGTV 2
CNBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> just a few days until christmas, and europe, as elsewhere in the world, it is a time for peaceful contemplation with family or close friends. a very warm welcome to this special edition of "european journal" from belgium. christmas is a few days for rest where we find time for leisure, which has almost become a luxury good, but we will try to find it in today's show. that's why we have come to the flemish part of belgium. it is all-bishops town famous for tower bells, and when the time, it is a good opportunity to pause for a moment. >> the music of bells. the master coaxes melodia sounds from the musical instrument. high above the roofs of the town. >> for me, bell music is the connection between everyday life and spiritual life. it does not have to be religious, but there is definitely something spiritual about playing here. >> even as a child, he loved the sound of bells. the musician says it makes him dream, and for more than 30 years, he has been living that dream. >> it is a very social and communicated instrument. all the people in the town can hear it, and the
carry three times that amount. it is part of russia's plan to reduce its reliance on europe, which currently buys about 87% of the country's oil exports. during price talks with europe, russia has also -- often said it would seek other buyers and focus more on asian buyers. >> china's biggest producer of so-called rare earths has suspended output at some of its plants for another month as part of an effort to push up prices. >> rare earths are a group of elements crucial for making high-tech gadgets like smartphones and ipads, and they're mostly found in china, giving producers a handle on the market. and despite that, prices are falling. >> rare earths are, in china, but many minds in mongolia have fallen silent. state media says that will not change or at least another month. the country's biggest roberts player is trying to stop falling prices. as the world's biggest rare earths supplier, has plenty of power on the market. chinese companies -- of 97% of the global share of rare earths. the u.s. share is much smaller by comparison, as is russia's. rare earths prices have been div
's fueling the weather. houston expect your temperatures to drop right off. then as we look into europe, several storm systems pushing across central and western europe bringing heavy rain showers at times. but temperatures on the mild side. london and paris at 9 and 11. really cools off in moscow. minus 1 for your high on your wednesday. here is a look at the extended forecast. >>> we'll be back in 30 minutes with more news. i'm gene otani in tokyo. from all of us here at nhk world, thanks very much for joining us. have a great day wherever you are.
for shorter, thinner trees, as europe and america have themselves a slightly more frugal christmas. across the industry, sales are expected to fall 15% compared with last year, so the businesses that are doing best are the ones that can adapted to the new reality. this luxury plastic tree used to be popular, but this year, this factory boss tells me the thinner trees account to a to two-thirds of sales to his european customers. it is not just trees. some factories report that foreign customers are buying smaller bobbles, too. amid the gloom, the chinese christmas factories are looking for sales in a surprising place, the domestic market. more and more people are following christmas traditions and others. this man tells me, "i want to set up my own christmas decorations store one day." as europe and america become, well, a little more scrooge like, they need their own people to be the source of glad tidings for christmases to come. bbc news. >> well, china, the country has been giving the song "gangnam style" a bit of a makeover. >> at this be marked -- at this theme-park. that song is a w
recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atomic river above and below the n. no one in civilian authority, not even lincoln, had any detailed knowledge of
is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against
of films. the film come is going to do if they could export to europe. but instead of talking about that, she lashed out at an audience that is almost all jewish. he lashed out at them and say stop making anti-hitler films. unless you stop taking anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you're going to cause the next work. boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled and there'll be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism in this world ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jew's. by 1940, he was a total absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if you wanted, he could have a chilling the america first community, signed up with lindbergh. but he didn't want to do that because he knew if he did that there'd be no place in politics for his children at her,, ever. so he stayed quiet. there are actually as part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be that tell you, that you're going to have to read. [laughter] in 1940, he was a kennedy name is in the dirt. it is dirt among the isolationists for kennedy to comment against
in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940»
for the rest of europe. as they fought for europe the next place they were at was breast which was there was a coastal port, a major fortification, the allies needed to resupply their forces and needed the harbor. the only problem was there was another gun issue. like pointe du hoc it was a suicide mission. the battery, the grass battery, as many people called it, had massive battle should sized guns that were buried most of the entire fortress was buried underground, picture kind of a four story building fortress that had been buried underground. there were elevator's going down, there was an entire hospital, mess hall, everything. to the naked eye, you look across a farmer's field and all you see is a tiny little pillbox, that was the battery and for months the men of "dog company" tried to find that battery and take it. that was their objective. the guns were devastating. they fought on hill's 63 in the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an entire hedgerow, small mound of earth and barry men alive and that is exactly wh
tough on crime, and in europe, similarly. it's not generally the standards to be putting people behind bars for a possession of any drug in small amounts for one's own personal use. and perhaps the paramount example of success in this regard is portugal. portugal 11 years ago decriminalized the possession of all drugs in personal use amounts. drug selling is illegal and you can still be arrested for that. they began doing evaluations a few years ago. you do not go to jail for possession of any drug in a small amount. and you are not drug tested. nobody gets thrown back in for dirty urines and all this sort of stuff. it's now been in place for 11 years. the research on that, and i recommend the piece in the british journal of crin knowledge and kid send it to -- cridge -- criminolgy. cases of h.i.v. and hepc and crime went down and people continued to seek treatment, that the rates of drug use in portugal did not go up at the same rates as comparable countries in europe. that suggests powerful evidence that you cannot just turn smling from a felony to a misdemeanor but eliminate the cri
off in europe it's made its way over here. how many times have we tossed away that broken coffee machine and bought a new one. inspiring others fix those broken household items. >> everything old is new again at the west seattle fix it collector. >> a group of that's like to get together and help each other fix whatever we own. >> from sewing machines to fans to lawn mowers, if it is broke they will try to fix it repair groups have flourished in europe and spreading to the united states. >> i like the idea of reusing something that has already had a life, already been built and created most of its environmental foot prints. >> members of the fix it collectors in brooklyn help people save the planet and a buck or two. >> throw away culture motivates a lot of us to come here and try to fight it. the economy definitely played a role. minute it breaks or the newest gadget comes out they have to get the new one and throw the old one away. it's expensive and what are we doing to the planet. >> so big in europe they attract up to half a million dollars in grants. not so here in the unit
, the mercury hit 20.7 celsius, a record. a similar picture elsewhere in central europe, having an impact on how people celebrate christmas. >> these icicles are fake, just like the polar bears. a real winter wonderland would melt in the blazing sun of the atlantic coast. people are just. there holiday activities to suit the weather. >> it is wonderful weather for this season. usually it is cold. >> experiencing unseasonable sunshine. flocking to beer gardens and parks for a different take. >> we are not getting a christmas tree this year. it is better to just sit in the garden and enjoy things. >> switzerland is reporting record temperatures as well. these have shed their winter coats for a cool dip. this christmas, the only snow will be on the mountain tops. >> there will be a lot of well wishing from merry christmas to happy new year, but what exactly is happiness? >> that's a very good question. we went ahead and ask anyway. here are some of the answers we got. ♪ >> being have been means unexpected things happen and change live in ways, not for yourself but also for your family, the enviro
popular surge. >> eastern europe after the war, it's a black hole, actually in european history, very few people know very much about it. one of the points of writing the book was to put together both work people have done in other langes and also to use archives and interviews to tell a story that hasn't been very well told. how it is communism took over the region, how is it done. >> how quickly after the end of world war ii did the iron curtain, communist take over europe? >> it actually happened quite fast in the sense that when he red army came into the region, they were already prepared. they didn't know how long it was going to take and didn't have a ten-point plan but they began trying to control key institutions from the beginning, including the secret police, and also the radio and various -- other parts of the society they considered important. that one from from '44 or '45. >> where were the strongest areas of resistance? >> probably in poland. there was an armed resistance, the partisans, who were operating from the woods, particularly in eastern poland, and they were -- >> l
. looks like he is now leaving western europe just dropping off some presents in britain and also ireland, working his way across the atlantic ocean. we are at 4.1 billion and counting. tracking santa tonight. this is an early christmas present for snowfall total if you are a fan of snow. over the weekend, 57 inches of snowfall. heavenly, 54 inches. there is more coming up tonight and tomorrow. 140% of normal is the show pact right now. last year, 27%. we have five times as much snow this year compared to last year on christmas eve. tonight we will be in the 40s. 24 concord down to 40. a little chilly for the kids early tomorrow morning. low pressure moving in. there is not as much moisture to go with this. also, the storm tracker will be a little bit far to the north. we're not expecting any flooding. what i do expect, high pressure to build back in. we will be sunny and dry to wrap up christmas week, but we will be wet tomorrow. rain moves in from north to south. we're not expecting a repeat of all the severe weather we had over the weekend. mountain viewh view, 54. 51 for naapa and low
and the mayors say it will be the flagship of the grain movement in europe. not everyone is so enthusiastic. >> of course i think about the environment, but i'm afraid the dozer -- that those that are used to traveling by car will not use the system. >> if the price of fuel was hired, people might not use car s, but people will not use it just because it is free. >> i do not think it really is free, because we are paying taxes. >> three-quarters of voters backed the proposal in a referendum. ho only one-fifth of those eligible took part in the polls. -- only one-fifth of those eligible took part in the poll. the opposition here says this is less about the clean environment, and more about political hot air. the mayor denies he is simply trying to win votes and says the scheme will pay for itself by attracting more business. >> i want it to be the green capital of the eu. >> some estimates say it costs $19 million, the waste of public money. >> there will have been no significant decrease in car transportation, or increase in public transport. that is why it is political. >> it is an idea th
. today armenian food has food from the mediterranean, middle east and europe. >> this is san francisco with the largest armenian food festival and widely recognized as one of the best food festivals in the area. we have vendors that come up from fresno, los angeles. we have everyone here in the neighborhood. that's really what it is, is drawing people to see a little bit of our culture and experience what we experience weekend in and weekend out. >> we are behind the scenes now watching the chef at work preparing some delicious armenian. this is a staple in armenian cooking, right? >> absolutely since the beginning of time. soldiers used to skewer it on swords. we have chicken ka bob, beef, lam, onions, parsley, over 2 pounds of meat being cooked in three days. >> after all that savory pro seen, i was ready to check out the fresh veggie options. * protein this is armenian. tomatoes and olive oil, that makes it summer food. what i'm doing is i'm putting some latinae. it's kind of like cream cheese without. when they offer you food, you have to eat it. they would welcome you and food is
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
freddie brazil to northern europe to alleviate his seasonal depression. >> seasonal effective disorder does spell out sad. >> this was one sad little snowball when he migrated down to brazil, he forgot to think about one thing. right now it's coming up on summertime. what does flaky have to do? >> might need to sit in a bowl of ice cubes. >> that would work but then he wouldn't be able to move around and explore brazil. what flaky does is find shadows. >> pulls the old vampire routine. flaky, if i had to say anything, i'd say now is the season you should be around snow and be around your snowball friends. come back from brazil. hope you had a nice vacation. come back. >> they said when they leave their beagle susie home alone, they leave her in the living room when they realized she doesn't need a playmate. >> oh, no. >> she chases that ball all over the living room. >> looks like the dog has got a toy, like something on the floor. doesn't want to play with that. >> she's, you know, feeling the season. >> she's like, man, i love these toys that come out once a year. >> but sadly she lo
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
and mexico ohio, it could be the one-vote election. don't be so scared? >> everyday the worries about europe, greece, things are going pretty well in america. you would think it is a horrible obsession with the recession. we have a need to be scared. we always look out for the predator. but all the headlines sugges things are bad. >> what happened with avian flu? >> you might have gotten brain cancer from yourself loan. and it could have been is one of the most dangerous praises, art carden? >> yes. people ovestimate very, very small risk. the ada your child could be affected is what people worried about but if you were, he would never get to in the car again. the risk of driving a car is so much greater than a terrorist attack or ap did dollars -- obligee were driving into would year. john: it kill the 3,000. >> but then cost us $10 trillion and made of the world hates us now other issues are happening in the middle east. middle east. john: food for thoug how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your cus
i think has not really hit this country yet, but which we're beginning to go through in europe where we're realizing that unrestrained capitalism is a hiding to nowhere and it doesn't protect the population as it should and we have to completely start to re-evaluate how we use capitalism as an instrument for feeding and housing our population. tavis: yeah. there an increasing number of folk in this country who feel the same way, that now is a good time to start rethinking capitalism as we know it. but to even raise that conversation gets you labeled un-american in many circles, so i can imagine how difficult it must be to get off the ground. >> well, i'm not american, so i can be un-american. [laughter] tavis: [laughter] and you can come back on this program any time you want. >> all right, tavis. tavis: i'm delighted to have had you here. >> nice to see you. tavis: jeremy irons, one of the stars of the new project, "the words." good to have you here. we'll see you again soon, i hope. that's our show for tonight. you can download our new app in the itunes app store. i'll see you back
earlier and in the use of rubber bullets and i lived in europe for a long time and i can safely say that all weapons are harmless and tasers are no exception. even though they are disguised as a less lethal option and amnesty international reported that 500 people in the u.s. died since 2001 in california alone. we know that mentally ill people are particular risk but so are others, such as elderly, pregnant woman, and people with heart problems and drug users. i believe that there needs to be another alternative for crisis intervention teams and one without weapons. thank you. >> hope, as the founder, i have been for 40 years, and needless to say in that time i have encountered many people in crisis, and i am 76 years old and i am still there, and i hope that we will not put tasers in the hands of our police officers or anyone else especially those dealing with people in crisis. and i have dealt with many people in crisis, on the street, in our facilities and in our safe house for the homeless, addicted prostituted women who are trying to change their lives. i shutter to think what
most in other societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of
of medicinal uses in europe. used for everything from headaches to cancer, supposedly enhance the immune functioning. which really is not -- what do you think? >> if it works and why not. a lot. so maybe we should be legalizing all of it. melissa: over centuries mistletoe has been used as a cure all and kind of like a folk remedy, but sometimes when you hear about old-time folk remedies that iran might use are recommended, they are the best things for what ails you. now they are doing serious research. melissa: it could be just the kissing that is helping. have we isolated it from the mistletoe? >>he new leaders of the germans took the fun out of it. there were feeding its people. melissa: i see. thank you for clean that up. the national dual log. blaze for more than 50 years. this year the layout of the holiday display was in serious -- mysteriously changed. there was a chance the fire will be rekindled next year. what do you think about this? >> such a bummer. ch a huge holiday tradition for so many people who go down to washington and take a look at the white house and might visit the
to their passage into europe. whatever their private feelings, they say their criticism of imperialism were french in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shanghai he obtained passports, documents of the league of nations have begun to issue to sta
of a gene use. jen use. it might make them so powerful no one in europe can stand up to this em. a century from now is not my problem. the news goes back. they take the news of the purchase back. the news arrives in boston. boston is the federalist tear toy. it's the opposition for the jefferson administration. that want to deprive jefferson of try yumple. they set off a fireworks display. it wasn't a controversial thing in american politics. no. american politicians were really enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jeff
the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard. >> i take it as a politician in our modern sense of the word female black the common touch. >> very few of the leaders of this country did at the time. they were all university graduates except for george washington and george washington was an autodidact commotion so fed 6000 books. this was an elite. constitution did not give liberty to the ordinary man. all it did was replace the king with the president. but it gave congress the same right. congress could tax. the constitution did not provide liberty
left europe at about 7:00 p.m. covered south america in a jiffy and is making its way to california. to see santa's progress go to ktvu.com. >> santa claus on a move. >>> we'll ta oh, you have a keurig vue brewer? oh, it's great! now i can brew my coffee just the way i love it. how do you do that? well, inside the brewer, there's this train that's powerful enough to carry more coffee and fresh water to make coffee that's stronger and bigger... and even hotter! actually, i just press this button. brew the coffee you love -- stronger, bigger, or hotter -- with the keurig vue. >>> and happening now, we want to go to the lefty o' doules bar where santa's helpers have collected 5,000 toys so far a little under their goal of 15,000 but they said late tonight that their toys include big items including bicycles and other generous gifts. you can drive up or give your toy to any bar driver. that drive ends when the bar closes at 2:00 this morning. >>> there was no joy for the 49ers yesterday. they can still essentially get what they want. >> they can get a first round bye if they beat arizon
. according to global santa cams st. nick left europe at about 7:00 p.m. covered south america in a jiffy and is making its way to california. to see santa's progress go to ktvu.com. >> santa claus on a move. >>> we'll take one last look at lefty o' doules. that's where a toy drive is under way. we'll tell you how many toys have been collected so far. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment
conquered. he liberated europe. he didn't need it. teddy roosevelt's an interesting example. he got war out of his system by charging up san juan hill as a young man. he was the ultimate war lover. nobody loved war more than teddy roosevelt. he was almost completely crazy about it, but he got it out of his system by doing it himself. and when he became president, you know, he talked about speak softly but carry a big stick, the great white fleet and he believed in power, but he was not desperate to rush into a war because he had already proved himself. >> which then leads us to what we see today and what is coming out of the wars that we're in today. obviously president obama's history, his story is not over yet. evan, you were talking about presidents driven by a high-minded ideology. what is president obama's as he tries to draw down yet goes in with these firm strikes? >> he just wants to get out. all this talk about nation building and helping afghanistan become a real country, they're not talking about that now. they just want out. they don't want to have al qaeda over there but -- >>
. take a look at this. in the u.s. there are 100 groups. u.k., 200. europe, 500. what is going on? >> this is part of a growing global backlash against the wind industry. this is very successful portraying itself as green. we produce green energy, green lech i very, reduce co2 emissions. when you look at countries around the world, australia, new zealand, huge backlash in ontario, we're seeing backlash against the large wind projects going in all over the place. gerri: talk about new york. you have an interesting example there. >> just last month lawyers here in new york filed lawsuits, 60 residents in herkimer county, just north of albany, they filed a lawsuit saying these project, wind turbines, built within 1000 feet or so of residences are emitting all the noise, keeping them up at night, diminishing property values and they filed suit. i think it is indicative of the backlash. gerri: this is interesting. you say this is the first time it will be heard in court of law, the issue about the sound. >> in the u.s., yes. gerri: seems to me that is pollution. >> sure it is. that is
territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century, the political consequences of this. political nature in the horror of the vacuum. the vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting. fascism and communism. fascism -- a meaningful life of racial estimate. communism, adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history is unfolding destiny. the excruciating political paradox of modernity is this. secularism advanced as part of a moral revolution against the bloody history of religious strife. even those of us who are members of the growing "n
are here for an orientation day and would like you to talk with them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school system. but england, europe, the law is undergraduate. these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. there was a room smaller than this, maybe 80 people. i'm justice kennedy here to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking and the student raised her hand and said, now, checks and balances are very important in your constitution and the president checks the congress and the congress checks the president, who checks the courts? good question. we talked about that. i'm not sure i had a satisfactory answer. there is an answer but -- and another student raised his hand and said, now, federalism is very important in america but money goes to washington and then goes to the states with conditions with. and doesn't this undermine federalism? we talked about that. then a student raised their hand and said chief justice john marshall
europe. we would do fine over the next twenty years if we get government to quit screwing up. [applause] but imagine the consult assistant consult ant report if they said general washington, we have you have one ax and 14,000 people. we think this is bad. we think you should be deeply depressed and consider quitting. a congress isn't doing well enough doesn't deserve the loyalty. why don't you go home? they wanted to be free. and they prepared to die. when they crossed dpez on christmas night on a desperate and last effort before the army seizes to exist. the slogan, or pass word is victory or death. and they meant it. it wasn't victory cry or six weeks. or victory or i'm not going watch fox news for a month. it wasn't victory or i think i'll pout. all right people really passionate about the idea that freedom was the right god had given them. they weren't going fail god by giving it up. finally we get to yorktown, the last novel in washington. it's a great gamble. the country is exhausted. washington can't win the war by direct assault. he's sitting outside of new york. the royal navy
meant it literally. democracy was a radical idea in the middle of the 19th century still. all of europe in 1848 was in flames about whether or not they were going to have democracies or monarchies. and the world didn't know yet whether or not democracy was simply another name for chaos. and the coherence of a people's government which is what he saying in the gettysburg address was an important thing to prove, not just that we could create a government of the people, but that it could endure a terrible test. and i think that he felt that to have the war end without slavery being eliminated -- >> once and for all, not just with the emancipation proclamation-- >> -- had once and for all, right. >> -- but by the constitution. >> right, and i think that you see how important that was to him and that he tried to and succeeded in getting the house to pass it, at the same to keep his party which was enormously, it's the like democratic party today, it's blue dog democrats, there were sort of blue dog republicans. half the republican party was conservative and weren't sure that they liked, they
or " norad'.. he is in western europe. he has just left the united king start northern ireland, and then i will lead with four. billion the gifts have been delivered. and then-you will go from ireland from northern ireland. he is going to go west and eventually will ride in the bay area. around the world. it is difficult to pinpoint exactly where he is but needless to stay we will continue to follow this developing story. >> the real story could be on the slatsanta's sleigh the real story-however, take a look at this interesting impersonators in sweden. they were spotted showing off their skill on motorcycles. >> a home in san diego has been decorated with 35,000 christmas lights. a neighbor took this video -- showing the huge display.. he says the family has set up elaborate displays for many years.despite power bills that run about a thousand dollars. >> this toy drive is that lefty voca--o ' tooloes. the wanted to collect about 15,000 but they've only collected 1000. >> this is the 12th year that the san francisco firefighters toy program has had a last minute toy drive with 44,000 chi
it was possible to just keep giving in to him, so that he would not carry out his plans to conquer europe. that's where the word "appeaseme "appeasement" really was the strongest and is really the indictment about how the western powers behave. >> first of all, what year did you flee check slozechoslovakic? >> in march of '39. >> and how old were you? >> i was 2. >> and my father was a member of the check slovak diplomatic service. and he was out of belgrade when i was born. >> did your father know mika's uncle, grand uncle, i guess who was president of czechoslovakia? >> definitely. he worked for them, and he felt very strongly -- czechoslovakia was a very interesting place in the interwar period. it was the only functioning democracy. it was created in a large part because of woodrow wilson's policies is and the constitution was modeled on the american one, except one big thing, it had an equal rights amendment in it, even then. and basically, there was a desire by people like my father, who was in his early 30s, to try to make sure that czechoslovakia stayed democratic. so he then left, he w
plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >> in september 2011, college student sam eshaghoff was arrested and charged with fraud and criminal impersonation. his crime was taking the s.a.t. and a.c.t.s for other people. he was so good at it, other students paid him thousands of dollars to take the exams for them, which he did at least 16 times. the case raised questions about the integrity and security surrounding one of the most important tests millions of high schools students ever take. in january 2012, sam eshaghoff told alison stewart how and why he did it. >> i thought there was an easy way to make money. and just like any other easy way to make money, it's always too good to be true. >> who told you you were in trouble? >> my parents got a phone call s
and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can listen to it on talk radio. they really hated this guy. now that the election is over, some of these programs are no
could quickly and by yourself. bring the microphone over here. >> i come from europe. everybody talks about [inaudible] . we need to know. i was wondering with this crazy schedule, how do you balance the family time? the mother is the most important role in the family for a child. the child is the future of everything we talk here. we teed dignity. how can a woman in the united states be independent and dreaming of a career if she has ? child' the united states is way behind many other countries. many countries to cut even care if a woman has maternity leave. here they have to worry that she has children. thank you. >> does anyone want to take on that? >> i will be happy to do that. i talked about getting up at 4:35 a.m. what i do when i get up, i have a son who's grown up now. when i get up his off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years i actually made choices in terms of what was in the pathway i was on. what i was doing in order to treat the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is so very import
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)